Okay people, now let’s get in formation because it’s back-to-show time!  A set of more serious definitions is in order to brush up on your sartorial terminologies!mirandaP

 

Gaiter

Definition: A piece of fabric worn over the shoe, extending to the ankle or the knee. These are functionally used in military and for horse training for protection. On the runway, this style adds a regal aesthetic to the garment.Gaiter

 

 

Galloon

Definition: Another style borrowed from the military camps, a galloon is a decorative woven trim usually in the form of braids made from metallic gold, silver, lace and embroidery. This technique is also used in home decor.Galloon

 

 

Gathers:

Definition: As the name suggests, gathering is nothing but a sewing technique to add fullness and volume to the garment. In this process, a piece of fabric is folded or bunched up together manually or using a machine and sewn on which results in shortening the width of the cloth thus adding volume. Common types of gathering techniques include pleating and shirring.gathers

 

Gingham:

Definition: Commonly known as the “Picnic Plaid”, gingham is a lightweight fabric characterised by its checked plaid pattern usually in two colours.gingham

 

Godet

Definition: A godet is a piece of fabric generally triangular and circular in shape, which is set into the garment to add more flare and volume. This technique is commonly used for dresses, skirts and wedding gowns.godet

 

Trendin Word of the Day

Gladiator shoes:

Be it down-to-earth flats or sky-high heels, the gladiator style in shoes has been making waves at the fashion scenes. This spotlight-stealing trend has been seen on our favourite style divas like Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid and we are betting on it to go bigger this season!Gladiators

If you missed out the previous posts in this series, you can find it right here(A, B, C,D,E, F).

Sound off in the comment below and let us know which trend caught your attention recently!

Until then…

miranda

 

 

Source: Vogue UK, Pinterest, Vogue US, Wikipedia, Elle.com